Tag Archives: my cup of tea

Tea Time: Ti Kuan Yin Oolong (Review)

Well, I finally got to visit the tea shop My Cup of Tea again, after having been away from Montreal for a year. You would think that in Korea I could have visited some nice tea sMy Cup of Teahops and tasted some interesting teas, but though I went to a tea expo, it seemed to be less about tea and more about crockery.

My Cup of Tea

In any case, I wanted to pick up some of their Milky Oolong, which I hadn’t tasted in a long time, so I headed over to China town, where the shop is located on St. Laurent. The staff was helpful as always, and you’re free to smell thMCOT tease tea samples. The boxes of teas also look colourful and inviting. While I was there, I decided to pick up a box of ginseng oolong, which I had already tried, as well as a box of Ti Kuan Yin oolong.

Ti Kuan Yin

This tea is a few dollars pricier than their other teas, at $18 for 100g as opposed to $15, and it is limited edition. When considering the price, however, one should keep in mind that these types of premium, whole leaf, hand-rolled teas can be re-steeped up to 3 times.

Ti Kuan Yin (back)

Ti Kuan Yin (front)

The Chinese Goddess of Mercy

According to the package, this tea is named after the Chinese goddess of mercy, and Kuan Yin is short for Kuan-shi Yinwhich means “observing the sounds (or cries) of the (human) world.” IN one legend, Kuan Yin sets out to save all sentient beings from their unhappy plight. However, since there were so many people who needed to be saved, she struggled so to comprehend their suffering that her head split into eleven pieces. When the budda saw what had happened to her, he gave her eleven heads. After that, she tried to reach out and help all of the beings who were struggling. However, since she only had two hands, they shattered into pieces. Again, the budda helped her, giving her one thousand arms.

While I’m not quite sure what the goddess has to do with this tea, I do enjoy reading such legends.

Taste

This tea has a rather delicate, mild flavour. It does carry a hint of Ti Kuan Yin (leaves)sweetness, but I wouldn’t really describe it as floral. I’d like to try it iced after over steeping it a bit, as I think that may help to draw out its flavour. Ti Kuan Yin does have an interesting mouth-feel and its delicate taste does linger on the tongue, as is described on the box.

Well, ’til next time…enjoy your cup of tea!

Tea Time: Milky Oolong

My Cup of Tea

My Cup of Tea- Milky OolongI happened to be in Chinatown one day, and came across a nice looking tea shop called My Cup of Tea. My interest piqued, I decided to go in, and encountered a thoughtfully laid out space: a rectangular room lined with shelves showcasing different varieties of tea, most of which were packaged in cute little chinese takeout container-shaped boxes.

There were some samples of the different teas next to their boxes on the shelves, but due to their increased exposure to air, the samples were not that fresh, and thus, not very fragrant, so they did not provide much assistance when selecting a variety of tea to purchase.  The young man working there, however, was very helpful and was clearly passionate about tea.

The company has its own tea farCup of Milky Oolong team in China, which allows them greater control over the quality of their product.  The leaves are also hand-picked, and hand-rolled.  The tea is grown ‘chemical free’, so I guess it is organic (or almost so), though it is not certified as such in Canada, nor does the word appear anywhere on their packaging.

Oolong Tea

Oolong teas are semi-fermented, and are processed almost like black teas.   The difference lies in the degree of oxidation of the tea leaves.  Black teas are fully oxidized, while white teas are barely oxidized at all.  Oolong teas are closer to black teas than any other type of tea in this respect, and are a lovely yellow colour when brewed.  I had tried oolong tea before walking into My Cup of Tea, but their milky oolong really blew me away.

Milky oolong tea leaves
The tea actually stays surprisingly fresh in the paper cup.

 

 

Milky Oolong

Some fascinating information on Milky Oolongs can be found on the Tea Trekker website.  The tea comes from a particular tea cultivar, called Jin Xuan.  Although this cultivar is relatively new (it has only been around since the 1980s!)  it has become very popular, and is now one of Taiwan’s four main tea cultivars.  It has a creamy, sweet flavour like that of no tea I have ever tasted before.  I’m not sure it has an ‘orchid aftertaste’ as is claimed on the box, but it can be infused multiple times, which is pretty cool (and economical)!

I recommend passing by one of their two locations, if you can, but you can also purchase tea from My Cup of Tea online.  ‘Till next time, enjoy your cuppa!